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Tuesday, November 27th, 2018

The 5 worst job interview questions
Job interviews are a time-consuming but necessary task in order to find the right candidates.
We know it can often be tricky to think of the right questions to ask. Falling into the trap of
asking bad job interview questions can not only leave you without the information you need
but also put your business’ reputation at risk.

 
1. ‘Tell me about yourself’
This question is overused, uncreative and magnificently broad. Instead, use
thought-provoking questions that generate interesting responses- such as “Who inspires you
and why?” or “What motivates you to come to work every day?”

 
2. ‘What would your worst enemy say about you?’

In general, it’s best to stay away from negative questions. Instead, ask more positive
questions such as “What would your best friend say about you?”

 
3. ‘What’s your biggest weakness?’
You don’t need to ask the candidate what their flaws are. When put on the spot, candidates
are likely to lie or use canned responses about their flaws to impress you – encouraging
dishonesty from the get-go. You could instead try, ‘can you give an example of how you
have dealt with stressful situations in a work environment?’

 
4. ‘Tell me about the worst boss you’ve ever had’
We’d advise steering clear of any questions that encourage negativity and complaining. This
question would most likely lead the candidate to provide you with quite a cynical answer
which might, in turn, give you an unfairly bad impression of their character. An alternative
question could be ‘what kind of management style do you respond to best?’

 
5. ‘Tell me a joke”
This kind of question will provide you with very little valuable information about the
candidate’s skills, experience and qualifications. It also puts the candidate on the spot and
can leave them feeling awkward and embarrassed. However, it is important to try and find
out in an interview if the prospective employee’s personality will fit well with your company
culture. You might try asking ‘what do you like to do outside of work?’ or ‘what three words
would describe your ideal work environment?’

 
At Nicholas Howard, we’re here to add value to your recruiting process. We’ll help you draw
up an accurate person and role specification for the roles you’re recruiting in and present
you with the best available individuals. Contact us today to find out more about how we can
help.

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